Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: How to Find the Genius Within

In ancient Rome, the genius was the guiding spirit of a person. In some people, this spirit shown more brightly and they came to be known as “geniuses.” Today, we recognize special people with highly developed skills in music, art, science and other fields as “geniuses.” Most people have heard of geniuses: Mozart, Rembrandt, and Einstein, to name a few. One field of thought suggests that geniuses are born, not made, as if genius is written in the genetic code. But perhaps the Romans were right and each of us has a guiding spirit that we only need to tap to find our own genius. In this show, Manjir Samanta-Laughton, author of Punk Science and The Genius Groove, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of what the new developing scientific paradigm is saying about the hidden genius buried in all of us, and what we can do to find it.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: How to Find the Genius Within

In ancient Rome, the genius was the guiding spirit of a person. In some people, this spirit shown more brightly and they came to be known as “geniuses.” Today, we recognize special people with highly developed skills in music, art, science and other fields as “geniuses.” Most people have heard of geniuses: Mozart, Rembrandt, and Einstein, to name a few. One field of thought suggests that geniuses are born, not made, as if genius is written in the genetic code. But perhaps the Romans were right and each of us has a guiding spirit that we only need to tap to find our own genius. In this show, Manjir Samanta-Laughton, author of Punk Science and The Genius Groove, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of what the new developing scientific paradigm is saying about the hidden genius buried in all of us, and what we can do to find it.

Listen to this Episode

Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: How to Find the Genius Within

In ancient Rome, the genius was the guiding spirit of a person. In some people, this spirit shown more brightly and they came to be known as “geniuses.” Today, we recognize special people with highly developed skills in music, art, science and other fields as “geniuses.” Most people have heard of geniuses: Mozart, Rembrandt, and Einstein, to name a few. One field of thought suggests that geniuses are born, not made, as if genius is written in the genetic code. But perhaps the Romans were right and each of us has a guiding spirit that we only need to tap to find our own genius. In this show, Manjir Samanta-Laughton, author of Punk Science and The Genius Groove, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of what the new developing scientific paradigm is saying about the hidden genius buried in all of us, and what we can do to find it.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: Punk Science

Punk is a term more often associated with fierce rock music and harsh lyrics than as a form of science. The legacy of punk rock is one of rebellion, attacking conventional society and mainstream culture. “Punk Science” is also the name of a book by this week’s guest, Manjir Samanta-Laughton, of the UK, who has gained international fame for interpreting the findings of physics and cosmology in a new and creative way, and one that challenges mainstream science’s fundamental paradigm. She joins host Philip Mereton in a conversation about what a new scientific paradigm might look like and her own Black Hole Principle.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: The Power of an Open Mind

It’s hard to argue with the value of an open mind. It’s also hard to argue that many people have one. The problem seems to be that modern life feeds us with so many stereotypes, beliefs, labels, prejudices, and biases with which to categorize our world that we stop thinking “like a child” and more like someone “set in their ways.” Pigeonholing saves time in a hectic world. On this show, Tim Boyd, President of the Theosophical Society, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of how open-mindedness is something that not only advances our appreciation for the variety of life, but may also lead us to understand better our true inner nature. Also, in a Something More episode, Philip talks with co-director, Robin Beck of Kima Publishers out of South Africa, about dramatic changes occurring in the publishing world and how his 20-year business continues to prosper.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: The Power of an Open Mind

It’s hard to argue with the value of an open mind. It’s also hard to argue that many people have one. The problem seems to be that modern life feeds us with so many stereotypes, beliefs, labels, prejudices, and biases with which to categorize our world that we stop thinking “like a child” and more like someone “set in their ways.” Pigeonholing saves time in a hectic world. On this show, Tim Boyd, President of the Theosophical Society, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of how open-mindedness is something that not only advances our appreciation for the variety of life, but may also lead us to understand better our true inner nature. Also, in a Something More episode, Philip talks with co-director, Robin Beck of Kima Publishers out of South Africa, about dramatic changes occurring in the publishing world and how his 20-year business continues to prosper.

Listen to this Episode

Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: The Power of an Open Mind

It’s hard to argue with the value of an open mind. It’s also hard to argue that many people have one. The problem seems to be that modern life feeds us with so many stereotypes, beliefs, labels, prejudices, and biases with which to categorize our world that we stop thinking “like a child” and more like someone “set in their ways.” Pigeonholing saves time in a hectic world. On this show, Tim Boyd, President of the Theosophical Society, joins host Philip Mereton in a discussion of how open-mindedness is something that not only advances our appreciation for the variety of life, but may also lead us to understand better our true inner nature. Also, in a Something More episode, Philip talks with co-director, Robin Beck of Kima Publishers out of South Africa, about dramatic changes occurring in the publishing world and how his 20-year business continues to prosper.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: The Meaning of Life

What is the meaning of life? Of all Big Questions, this one may be at once the biggest, and the most befuddling. But can we proceed through life without at some point confronting the question? And, more importantly, does the question have an answer? On this show, Professor Jay Garfield of Smith College and the University of Melbourne (among other institutions), and lecturer for the Teaching Company’s course, The Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World’s Great Intellectual Traditions, joins host Philip Mereton in an invigorating discussion of different ways to approach this perennial question, and how we might learn from some of history’s great thinkers to find the meaning in our own lives.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: The Meaning of Life

What is the meaning of life? Of all Big Questions, this one may be at once the biggest, and the most befuddling. But can we proceed through life without at some point confronting the question? And, more importantly, does the question have an answer? On this show, Professor Jay Garfield of Smith College and the University of Melbourne (among other institutions), and lecturer for the Teaching Company’s course, The Meaning of Life: Perspectives from the World’s Great Intellectual Traditions, joins host Philip Mereton in an invigorating discussion of different ways to approach this perennial question, and how we might learn from some of history’s great thinkers to find the meaning in our own lives.

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Conversations Beyond Science and Religion: Is Religion More Natural than Science?

Science deals with the natural world; religion rests upon the supernatural. Science is empirical, methodical, and self-critical; religion deals with a truth revealed by God, and hence beyond questioning. But some cognitive researchers are finding that religion is in fact more natural than science; it comes fast and easy, and does not have to be taught or experienced. Science, meanwhile, is slow, hard, and time-consuming; it deals with things and ideas far removed from everyday life. The naturalness of religion means that despite all the advances of science, it may never go away. On this show, Dr. Robert McCauley, the Director of Mind, Brain, and Culture at Emory University, and author of the New Scientist article, “Natural Religion, Unnatural Science,” and the new book, Why Religion is Natural and Science Unnatural, joins host, Philip Mereton, in an engaging conversation about what brain research is telling us about the sustained power of religion in our scientific world.

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